Monday, 28 September 2009

Angry people change the world!

I read this article and thought it was a great answer to people who swerve biblical truth by calling you angry and all the other things used to remain in a place of unswerving arrogance:

Its from DavidFosterLive.com and while I'm not aware of the rest of his writing, this is pretty spot on!

10 ways angry people change the world:
: Things change. But whether they change for the better or not depends on what people do; not just any kind of people, but angry people. Yes, you heard it right. It’s angry people who change the world. Comfortable, satisfied, stuck-in-a-rut, trying-to-protect-my-turf people don’t change the world. They nurse the status quo, which I’ve heard is Latin for the mess we’re in.

It’s absurd to say that the way to change things is to make people angry. Most angry people are not constructive, but destructive. But it’s just as foolish to think that things will change when everyone is fat and happy.

So here are ten ways that angry people change the world:

1. There’s a wrong that must be righted, now.
We’re talking about a serious wrong; a principle, not a preference. Something is violated that leaves a gaping hole in the ethical fabric of life.

2. The wrong is in the circle of my influence.
There are two circles we have to always be aware of: the circle of my concern, and the circle of my influence. In the circle of my concern, I can pray, study, think, consider; there’s not much I can do. It’s only in the circle of my influence where I can make a positive change. Where there is a wrong that must be righted within the circle of your influence, you have the seed for a true revolution.

3. The wrong moves from a bother to a burden.
With a glaring wrong in front of you, it’s hard to ignore it. It’s an ethical thing, a principle; a violation of what’s right, good, and just about life and it bothers you. The minute it becomes a burden, something you can’t shake or run away from, it becomes your responsibility. You become the missionary, the mover of the movement.

4. “Someone ought to do something” becomes, “I must.”
Everyone talks about the things that ought to be different. These things are many. But the must-dos and must-haves of life are few.

5. The passion becomes a vision.
The real meaning of passion is to suffer. That’s what angry people do when there are wrongs that must be righted. They suffer. And when that suffering becomes intense, a vision arises; a picture of things not as they are, but of how they could be if something happened.

6. Other like-minded people catch the vision.
The visionary now talks to his friends and shares. He must. He can’t keep it inside. It’s a burden that can’t be bottled up.

7. First steps are taken.
This is the hardest thing to do; to take initiative, to take first steps when those first steps seem to be so woefully short of meeting the need of revolution and change. But they’re necessary. They’re always small, usually done in obscurity by lonely, angry people with a vision.

8. Results are small, but promising.
This, again, is a tenuous point in the process of change. We’re looking for big results. We want to make small input and have big output. That simply doesn’t happen. First results are small, but promising leading in the right direction.

9. More people buy into the mission as missionaries.
Results attract support. Results attract people. Movers and shakers like being around new things that are arising and happening. And when they come around the mission, they become missionaries.

10. Eventually, the movement creates APB.
APB stands for Abundance, Prosperity, and Blessing. Over time the vision of how things ought to be, and should be, and must be, translate into vision. Surrounded by people with steps, great things happen.

Here is the formula for how angry people bring about great change:
W+AP+V+MAP+T=REVOLUTION Simply said, a wrong, plus angry people, plus vision, plus more angry people, plus time, equal revolution.

3 comments:

Jacqueline Christodoulou said...

Passion, dedication and perseverance are on the dialectical axis of anger.

Gary Ward said...

Yes, I thought that too....

Wes said...

Good list, I totally agree, indifference will never change the world.